Browse Category: genderdynamics

How to Apply to a Job or Write an Email That Actually Gets a Response

I am one of those people who thinks jobs are irrelevant to making money, despite having a full-time job. I also believe in financial diversification, multiple streams of revenue, freelancing, and self-employment. I’ve had staff jobs, long-term freelance jobs, sold ebooks, got paid to participate in focus groups, transcribed amateur wrestling interviews, held temp jobs, and made money through traditional publishing routes.

I seem to be one of the few that jobs are sometimes fun. Or teach you things. Or give you a place to stop and rethink where you want to go. Or offer a useful way to learn how to launch your own business or harness skills to take to your freelance endeavors.

Regardless of if you want a job or a freelance life or are still just figuring your life out; you need writing skills to get there. It doesn’t matter if you’re not interested in being a writer, you still need them. If you can master a traditional job application via email, then you can master the query letter, guest post pitch, or anything else.

The real reason isn’t the practice or skill, but the creative strategy in its approach. Do you treat a prospective employer or client like they’re a listing found on Craigslist? Or a breathing entity whose time and point-of-view is valuable? If you can get past thinking of the email recipient as a robot or intimidating force that hides behind an HR Department, and start thinking of it as a practice in creativity, then you can land anything.

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Talking Heads

Financial data reported by mainstream media were once mercifully simple and brief. Reporters might tell us that interest rates had risen a quarter of a point, or that the unemployment rate had dropped a tenth of a point, or that the dollar had risen slightly against the German mark. But now, even on general news segments, we are bombarded with details once considered too technical even for seasoned financial industry professionals.

I watched recently as one of television’s talking heads reported that although the monthly trade deficit had dropped, the movement should not be interpreted as a positive sign. Why? Because export figures contained a large commercial aircraft shipment that markets had known about for months in advance. Another correspondent told me that the rise in the wholesale price index should be discounted heavily, because 34 percent of it was attributable to movements in traditionally volatile energy components of the index.

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How to Choose a Resume? Chronological vs Functional Resume.

Many people especially young job seekers mistake a resume’s purpose, they think a resume should to get them a desired job. In reality, the sole purpose of the resume is to open doors. Your resume purpose is to create interest so the employer will invite you in for an interview.

But how do you create that interest when you don’t exactly fit the job description? Here are some tips from Chris from MyCareerTools.com where they help students get an HSED (High School Equivalency Diploma)and teach them how to find a desirable job. If you are looking for a free practice test, and want to refresh your knowledge, check their website.

Use the resume to your advantage he says. Recently we weighed in about the usefulness of functional style resumes vs. chronological resumes.
Historically functional style resumes have been recommended for first time university/college/HSED graduates and career changers.

The functional resume had its heyday in the 70’s as a clever way to display one’s skillset. Now they are seen as a ‘bluffing tactic’ a way to distract an employer from undesirable information such as gaps in work history. And it’s not unusual for that type of resume to end up in the shredder! Continue Reading

Mastering English Pays Off

After six or seven months, Adel began to master English and make friends with American students. Her turbulent background has made her particularly grateful for the help she received at the High School Law, Advocacy and Community Justice. “The teachers really have this desire to help students… When I arrived I couldn’t say anything, but the teachers were always there helping me, which I really appreciated. In my country, if you don’t speak French they wouldn’t help you.”

Adel, whose favorite subject is math, now lives in Brooklyn with her siblings and mother, who works at Whole Foods. Life is still hard, she says, but “I love it here as I have a lot of opportunities to do well in the future.” The strife in the Congo region – which suffered a long civil war and continuing turmoil – forced Adel not to attend school for more than a year. “You could get shot at in the street,” she adds. Continue Reading

What you can learn from Mespa

Slow down, take a breath, and enjoy the countryside, where life takes on a peaceful more gentle pace. Quilting is one of those things, along with knitting and taffy pulling, that seems like it should be reserved for older women from pioneer days. Contrary to this stereotype, Denyse Schmidt of Denyse Schmidt Quilts is a modern woman born and raised in central Massachusetts who simply has a passion (and a talent) for patchwork.

She was raised in a family where hand-making things was normal: her father and mother made furniture and clothes in their spare time, and while they never made a career out of their talents, Denyse was inspired to take her capacity for creation a bit further. Continue Reading

Suh-Tweet: Twitter is Officially Stupid

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Suh-Tweet is a new word that I invented today. It is a play on the word “sweet”. Say it everybody: Suh-tweet. Kinda like “so sweet” except instead of sweet we say tweet.

Best of Stupid is officially on Twitter. That’s right folks, you are free to stalk our latest updates here. For you Twitter addicts out there, that’s kind of suh-tweet.

For those of you who don’t know what the heck Twitter is, consider yourself blessed, as you still have the opportunity to save yourself from being sucked into a time killing pointless vacuum. You should stop reading this post and hide under a rock as fast as you can if you are not on Twitter. SAVE YOURSELF.

You can officially declare something as stupid when you are sitting in the waiting room somewhere stuck watching some mainstream news channel and instead of reporting the news, the news anchors instead are talking for 30 minutes about Twitter and who they are following. Apparently knowing that someone we don’t know spilled coffee all over herself this morning is WAY more important than things like health care or world poverty.

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Are You The Judge?

download xI’m unsure where the direction of this post will go because my head is all in a jumble. Chances are you’ll get confused as the post continues, but try your hardest to do so, okay? Great.

It’s one thing for someone to know you for a short time, and then suddenly assume they know you enough to judge your future actions and decisions. Judgmental. Are you? I really hope you didn’t answer that with a no. As a human being with flaws out of this world, very far from perfection I think we all do it, and that’s just the way it is.

Don’t you dare think you’re not judgmental because it’s bad thing. The truth is, it’s not. Not always at least. Judgment is a must have characteristic which I think is closely tied to your instincts. The way you judge is what matters, or should I say the reasons your judgments about something or some one are based upon.

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Getting Back On My Feet

images-99My laptop has been repaired, and sadly nothing new will be exposed this post. Why? Well, with the laptop gone, nothing could have been made, created, or the like. But, instead during such a long break I had, I mapped out some ideas on notebook paper and have done a little brain storming for what is to come to the site.

Change is good? Of course it is, so there will be changes, preferably by early September. I think a lot of you will enjoy the updates and changes as the come slowly but surely and can’t wait to see how things turn out.

While I’ve been gone, I completed my Elite Scholar matriculation and successfully gotten through two more weeks of the oh so dreadful school. I also got a new cellphone and have just been going to marching band practice and doing what homework I could before I’d fall asleep from exhaustion.

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Operation Get Serious!

First off, I want to make it aware that this is the first time in a long time that I’ve blogged two days in a row. Yes, please go ahead and stand on your toes and give me a round of applause, I surely deserve it!

It’s not like I have anything major to talk about, but I did say once I found out more about the government honors thing I’d tell you all about it. So, yeah. Today myself and a bunch of others who were nominated received a pass to to go to the counselor’s office instead of the last period of the day.

I was angry because I had a test to take in that class, but it turned out I didn’t have to take that test. Any way, we all met in the faculty dining room. The lady told us what it was all about and it’s a very good thing to be a part of I must say.

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School vouchers and the NCLB conspiracy

635926207101648569-2142908890_manufacturingday11I hope a lot of people are concerned by a $100 million voucher proposal recently announced by House Republicans. The bill would provide voucher money to poor communities where public schools aren’t meeting the testing standards imposed by the No Child Left Behind Act.

(And to think some folks wondered what the real strategy behind NCLB was. The law’s goal isn’t to fix public schools—it’s to show how bad some of them are doing in order to justify vouchers.)

Although the bill’s sponsors acknowledged that Congress isn’t likely to vote on it this year, the very attempt proves that the religious right and the Republicans who do their bidding are indeed one rascally group.

Getting poor people to buy in on the voucher idea is a smart strategy, because it hits the public schools where they’re most vulnerable—in the country’s most economically devestated areas, where any kind of school would have a tough time educating children. Pandering to the poor also creates the illusion of the G.O.P. as champions of the disadvantaged. (You may have just choked on your coffee as you read that last sentence, but, hey, money talks in politics.)

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